Chatty, Chattier, Chattiest: “The Goat” Stage Door with Damian Lewis

Well, honestly, I did not think I would make this post. But I am making it, and you know what, it is writing itself! šŸ˜€

JaniaJania wrote about our London trip earlierĀ hereĀ butĀ then I did another one in May with Lewisto who had given me a London trip for my birthday back in January. We planned it as a week long immersion in Londonā€™s history, culture and food. We also planned to see The Goat and do the stage door for a quick hi to Damian; however, we did not think he would have time for a chat and so there would be no need to blog about this trip.

source: Damianista

I WAS WRONG šŸ˜€

Some of you may know Gozde whose wonderful fan story we published a few months ago here. We met thanks to Damian on Twitter two years ago, clicked immediately, met in London, and stayed in touch since then. So I let her know that I would be in London and we made plans to meet for drinks. I am now leaving it to her to share the story that made this post possible! Continue reading “Chatty, Chattier, Chattiest: “The Goat” Stage Door with Damian Lewis”

Damian Lewis Owns Edward Albee’s The Goat on Stage

A play is as good as its writing and acting. This is precisely what makes Albee and Lewisā€™ “The Goat, or Who is Sylvia?” a rare jewel. Yes, it is Edward Albee who wrote it, but it is Damian Lewis who owns it on stage.

Albeeā€™s The GoatĀ is one of the finest plays I have ever read or seen. I would be extremely lucky if I read a better one in my life time — minimalist and impeccable writing, full of punches back to back to the readerā€™s paradigm of morality. Continue reading “Damian Lewis Owns Edward Albee’s The Goat on Stage”

How I Have Fallen For “The Goat, or Who is Sylvia?”: A Review

ā€œHer breathā€¦ her breath wasā€¦ so sweet, warm, andā€¦ā€ – Martin

As much as I believe in live theater as the best art form ever, I also know, alas, dueĀ to geographical, financial and time constraints, only a limited number of people have access to a particular play staged at a particular place. Thus, I imagine, recording and streamingĀ the plays forĀ fans all overĀ the world would certainly make theatre a more democratic art form andĀ help young generations fall in love with it, too. National Theatre Live, a project initiated by the Royal National Theatre in London,Ā broadcasts, via satellite, live performances of their productions to movie theaters and art centers around the world. I hope, with technology at hand, this becomes common practice sooner than later.

source: Damianista

Now, having made my desperate statement about theater,Ā I feel extremely lucky to have seenĀ The Goat, a brilliantly written play turned intoĀ an acting feast in the hands of the ridiculously talented quartet of Damian Lewis, Sophie Okonedo, Jason Hughes and Archie Madekwe. JaniaJania has already written a fantastic review of the playĀ hereĀ and, with a little help from my memory and the pictures I have been able to findĀ online, I will now try my best to “stream” The GoatĀ for you with a bit of commentaryĀ on the side. Hope you enjoy it. Continue reading “How I Have Fallen For “The Goat, or Who is Sylvia?”: A Review”

London, The Goat, and Meeting Damian Lewis

The times I can see Damian in person are few and far between. It was at Damianista’s urging, i.e. pretty much taking me by the hand and flying me out to NY, that my first “sighting” and “meeting” even happened. (I have no idea what those quotes mean or why I used them, just go with me here) I vacillate often between “I’d be fine if I never saw him in person again, good riddance to that level of stress-filled gut-wrenching fangrl angst” to “Fine, I’ll see him on stage or something, but no reason to talk to him privately, is there? Can’t we be normal people for once and just go home and not talk to him?” to “OMG, when are we going to see him again, in what circumstances, for how long, can we possibly have it go longer, and what if…etc. etc. etc.” Truthfully, I spend about equal parts brain energy on those three states of fangrl-ness. Quite similar, in fact, to the brain energy allocation of an average 17 year old girl around prom time.

So, when we heard about The Goat, or Who is Sylvia? coming to London and started talking about it, there I was, torn among those three states. “I’ve got a sister right outside London,” I said. “I can stay with her!” And maybe take a couple weeks and see London, make like I’m 19 again, but, this time, somewhat have the money to do all the London things I’ve never had the chance to do. “Make it about London and not just about him,” said the part of my brain reserved for how crazy all THIS makes me look, justifying the insanity of all THIS by diluting it with a legitimate sight-seeing trip to a legitimate world capital city with loads of things that interest me anyway, even if it weren’t Damian’s home town.

Continue reading “London, The Goat, and Meeting Damian Lewis”

The Goat, or Who is Sylvia? – A review

Theater is unique from books or film because it’s necessarily a communal experience. Actors are in the same space as the audience. The story is fleshed out “live”, with no possibility of rewinding or re-reading. We see their breath, we can nearly see their hearts beating up there on stage and they can hear us too, our laughter, our gasps, and, eventually, hopefully, our applause. All of this combines to make theater an experience like no other.

Like our consumption of most art forms, our venture into the theater is, for the most part, about finding some escape, some entertainment, and, at its most sublime, some window into the human condition. Lots of folks really don’t want art to do more than that, don’t demand any more from it or from themselves when consuming it. Edward Albee’s The Goat, or Who is Sylvia, alas, does do more. It’s a window into the human condition alright, but not necessarily one that is very pleasant to see or comfortable to have to think about. It’s a tough play, mostly because you feel pulled, in directions you never would’ve imagined being pulled. The central conceit is a marriage falling apart due to an affair. Not your run-of-the-mill infidelity story, though, as the “other woman” happens to be a goat. Continue reading “The Goat, or Who is Sylvia? – A review”

Why “The Goat” is More About Us Than About a Goat

ā€œI almost dare not ask thisā€¦ but who is Sylvia?ā€ -Ross

The Goat, or Who is Sylvia?Ā has opened to rave reviews and BIG thanks go to the audience members, who happen to be our eyes and ears in the theatre, for sharing someĀ wonderful moments onlineĀ — like this fantastic curtain call on Instagram.

#thegoat #damianlewis #sophieokonedo

A post shared by Oliver Douglas (@oliverberlinmitte) on

In earlier posts about The Goat hereĀ and here, we deliberately avoided from giving any spoilers. But now that the cat (or should I say the goat?) is out of the bag in the play’sĀ reviews, in recent interviews Damian has given as well as in viewers’ postsĀ all over social media, I would love to give my two cents about why I believeĀ The GoatĀ is more about us than about a goat and that it deals with deeper and more universal themes than some might think. Now, if you are planning to go see the playĀ and you are not one for spoilers, STOP HERE. Otherwise, dive in!
Continue reading “Why “The Goat” is More About Us Than About a Goat”